Science

Rare 17-foot oarfish washes ashore in California

Rare 17-foot oarfish washes ashore in California

Fish rarely seen because it prefers the deep, open ocean

They are mysterious sea creatures that almost exclusively stay in the darkest depths of the ocean – between about 1,000 and 3,000 feet below the surface.

So it was an incredibly rare discovery to have an oarfish – the animal said to have spawned tales of sea monsters – wash ashore this week on South Catalina Island, one of the coastal isles off Los Angeles.

The dead fish, which was being picked at by seagulls and partially degraded, was discovered in the water off Sandy Beach by a harbor patrolman.

It took a large group of adults to pull the oarfish out of the water and bring it  ashore.

Rare find: A rarely-seen sea serpent was discovered Monday on a beach on the western end of Santa Catalina Island

Rare find: A rarely-seen sea serpent was discovered Monday on a beach on the western end of Santa Catalina Island

The island harbor patrol found a 17-foot dead oarfish floating in the waters off Sandy Beach

The island harbor patrol found a 17-foot dead oarfish floating in the waters off Sandy Beach

This is the second time in two years an oarfish has been found on Catalina, following a similar find in 2013

This is the second time in two years an oarfish has been found on Catalina, following a similar find in 2013

Oarfish are pelagic fish that usually stay within the dark depths of the ocean, below about 1,000 feet

Oarfish are pelagic fish that usually stay within the dark depths of the ocean, below about 1,000 feet






Science